Friday, April 18, 2014

Heeeeeeere's Johnny not exactly transcending comedy

LOS ANGLES -- There's really very little humor, if any, in "Transcendence," even though lead actor and, in the film, high-tech genius Johnny Depp infused a lot of during a recent conference to promote his latest movie.
It all started with the first question, "Did you feel a little like Max Headroom with those images (of yourself) on computer screens?"
"Yes, I did," Depp responded, "and I guess the worst part is that I liked it.
"I actually liked being in my little dark room, and (the other actors) were on the other side. We couldn’t find each other sometimes. It’s all done through videotape and sound."
Depp's Dr. Will Caster talks about his super computer in "Transcendence."
Then it got a littler weird.
 "I think this film is essentially about a man chosen by God," Depp continued. "He grew a long beard, grabbed a few insects, a couple of animals and knew the rest of the world will be slaughtered, but the animals will come to him and follow through."
Uh, and when first-time director Wally Pfister actually reminded his bona fide star that he somehow mixed up his latest with another little film called "Noah," Depp was quick with another quip: "That’s Noah? Oh No(ah)! Sorry, I was in that one as well. I played Russell Crowe. That beard was a bit too much, though."
Depp kept it coming after question two as well, when someone asked him about seemingly aging backwards after his character's brain was uploaded into a computer.
"Oh, that’s the 'Benjamin Button' movie. I was in that one, too -- as Brad Pitt."
And, when the same questioner pressed on about the benefits of artificial intelligence, Depp answered, "Well, having no intelligence myself, I look forward to gaining something, whether it be superficial, artificial or super-duper."
After a few minor quips while others in the cast and crew handled an assortment of queries, Depp came back with one final volley when everyone was asked to comment about working with an award-winning cinematographer now making his debut as a director.,
The busy actor's attention obviously was drifting when the moderator called, "Mr. Depp?"
Feigning real surprise, the actor blinked a couple of times and said, "Hey, is my father here?" Then came one final one-liner to bring down the house before, like everyone else, singing the praises of Pfister. "For a moment there," Depp said, "I thought I was in an intervention."
"Transcendence" opens today.

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

'Gravity' will pull down most Oscars, but not THE 'Best'

Bullock's film likely will win big, but her Oscar-nominated performance will not.
If anyone asks which film will carry home the most Academy Awards from Sunday night's 86th annual ceremony, just tell 'em that "Gravity" will. And, in a landslide!
Honestly, it doesn't take a genius to predict that director and co-writer Alfonso Cuaron's 90-minute space odyssey will float away with wins in five "Best" technical categories: Cinematography, Editing, Sound Editing, Sound Mixing and Visual Effects.
Add one more for composer Steven Price's likely Best Original Score (though I'd love to hear Alexandre Desplat's name called for "Philomena"). Then wager on Cuaron's own Best Directing grab, which will be the film's only victory among the evening's Big 6 categories, and it all adds up to a lucky seven Oscars.
No other movie will get even close to that awards count, but don't be surprised when Leo DiCaprio's "other" 2013 movie, "The Great Gatsby," of all old things, is among a potential slew of runners-up with its whopping total of two victories (for both Best Production Design and Best Costume Design).
In another relatively easy year on the prognostication front, here are my predicted winners in the other top categories (with personal preferences included):
Best Picture: "12 Years a Slave" (should win: "American Hustle").
DiCaprio will take down favored Matthew McConaughey in Oscar's biggest upset.
Best Actor: Leonardo Di Caprio, "The Wolf of Wall Street" (DiCaprio).
Best Actress: Cate Blanchett, "Blue Jasmine" (Blanchett).
Best Supporting Actor: Jared Leto, "Dallas Buyers Club" (Leto).
Best Supporting Actress: Jennifer Lawrence, "American Hustle" (Lawrence).
Best Adapted Screenplay: "12 Years a Slave" ("Philomena").
Best Original Screenplay: "Her" ("American Hustle").
And a few more picks:  "Frozen" (Best Animated Feature); "The Grand Beauty" (Foreign Film);
"20 Feet from Stardom" (Documentary); "Let It Go" from "Frozen" (Original Song); Dallas Buyers Club" (Best Makeup and Hairstyling).
Contenders in all categories -- and then some -- can be found at http://oscar.go.com/nominees.
     

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Critics broadcast features plaudits for Whitaker, "Before" trio

 The Broadcast Film Critics Association will honor Forest Whitaker with the Joel Siegel Award, to be presented to him by Oprah Winfrey, his co-star, in “Lee Daniels’ The Butler,” and Julie Delpy, Ethan Hawke and Richard Linklater will receive this year’s Critics’ Choice LOUIS XIII Genius Award at the 19th annual Critics’ Choice Movie Awards.
The rest of the night’s winners will be announced live at the Critics’ Choice Movie Awards ceremony Thursday from the Barker Hangar in Santa Monica.
 Hosted by Aisha Tyler, the star-studded awards gala will be broadcast live on The CW Network at 8 p.m. Red Carpet Pre-show coverage also will air in various local markets immediately before the awards ceremony.
"Butler" screen couple Winfrey and Whitaker reunite on stage Thursday night.
 The Joel Siegel Award is a special honor given by the BFCA in the name of “Good Morning America” film critic and founding BFCA member Joel Siegel, who lost his long struggle with cancer in June 2007.  The award is very special to the BFCA, honoring its namesake’s legacy and his belief that the true value of celebrity is as an enhanced platform to do good works for others.  It spotlights the leadership role so many great stars undertake to help solve the world’s most pressing problems.  Previous recipients include Sean Penn, Matt Damon and Don Cheadle.

Whitaker, an exceptional actor, won an Academy Award and a Critics’ Choice award for his work in “The Last King of Scotland,” and he was acclaimed this past year for his performance as Cecil Gaines in “Lee Daniels’ The Butler.” But he is also an exceptional humanitarian, who has worked to raise awareness about youth and violence. In 2012, he founded the Whitaker Peace and Development Initiative, dedicated to helping people affected by violence regardless of age, gender, nationality or faith. Its mission is simple: empower individuals by creating a space for them to be heard, and inspire youth, women and men to promote peace everywhere.
Matthew McConaughey will present Richard Linklater, Julie Delpy and Ethan Hawke with the Critics’ Choice LOUIS XIII Genius Award.  Given last year to Judd Apatow, the LOUIS XIII Genius Award recognizes “an unprecedented demonstration of excellence in the cinematic arts.”
The "Before" trio of collaborators are being recognized for creating one of cinema’s most compelling and unique romantic sagas.  The genius of their approach to this extended love story lies in its unvarnished honesty.
So will "Before Midnight" pair Delpy and Hawker (with co-writer/director Linklater).
Nearly 20 years ago, in the film, “Before Sunrise,” a romance ignited between two soul mates on a train to Vienna and defined a generation.  In the decades that followed, that generation grew up and the complicated characters played by Delpy and Hawke have matured right along with them.
In 2004’s “Before Sunset” and last year’s “Before Midnight,” the conversation between the French Céline and American Jesse continued to unfold in real time -- a sort of special cinematic effect which has long fascinated writer/director Linklater.
The Critics’ Choice Movie Awards are bestowed annually by the BFCA to honor the finest in cinematic achievement. The BFCA is the largest film critics organization in the United States and Canada, representing more than 280 television, radio and online critics.  BFCA members are the primary source of information for today's film going public.  Eligible films were released in 2013. The accounting firm of CMM, LLP tallied the written ballots.
Since its inception in 1995, the Critics’ Choice Movie Awards has been a star-studded bellwether event of the movie awards season.  Historically, the Critics’ Choice Movie Awards are the most accurate predictor of the Academy Award nominations.
Among nominees expected to attend the televised gala are Amy Adams, Cate Blanchett, Sandra Bullock, Bradley Cooper, Alfonso Cuarón, Bruce Dern, Leonardo DiCaprio, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Adèle Exarchopoulos, Tom Hanks, Spike Jonze, Jared Leto, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Melissa McCarthy, Matthew McConaughey, Steve McQueen, Robert Redford, Julia Roberts, David O. Russell, Martin Scorsese, Meryl Streep, Emma Thompson, Oprah Winfrey and Hans Zimmer.
Thursday evening's 19th annual Critics’ Choice Movie Awards will be produced by Bob Bain Productions and Berlin Entertainment.

Thursday, January 2, 2014

Favorite films of 2013 soon will give way to 2014 newbies

It's just the second day of 2014 and already TV ads for the first movies of the new year are running rampant.
Until they do open later this month -- and, just in case anyone really is eagerly awaiting the appearance of "The Legend of Hercules," "Ride Along" and/or "I,Frankenstein" -- please be content with one man's listing of his favorite films of 2013.

 
Lawrence and Adams both stop traffic in "American Hustle."
"American Hustle" --  The David O. Russell Players strike again, this time tackling their auteur's humorously distinctive take on the Abscam mess of the early-'80s. Oscar noms all-around, please.

"August: Osage County" -- A marvelously assembled ensemble cast, an absorbingly adapted Pulitzer Prize-winning play, and one very dysfunctional Oklahoma family.

"Before Midnight" -- One final (maybe?) brilliant take on a relationship that so nicely developed for Ethan Hawke, Julie Delpy and Richard Linklater in two movies "Before." 

"Blue Jasmine" -- Writing takes center stage again, with Woody Allen getting an Oscar-winning performance from Cate Blanchett as a woman on the verge, and then some. (Yes, I did say "winning." Skip the fuss and just give it to her now.)

"Captain Phillips" -- Somali pirates really captured the title character and his merchant vessel in 2009. Director and former documentary filmmaker Paul Greengrass puts us into the middle of it all and a great movie-going experience.

"The Conjuring" -- Easily the scariest, spookiest film of this or any other year. And, it doesn't need blood and guts to succeed. Can't wait for the sequel, but none of this could possibly be true, could it?

"Fruitvale Station" -- Speaking of truth, few knew about this chilling, Oakland-based New Year's Eve incident in 2008. Now, thanks to first-time feature director Ryan Coogler and a thrilling performance by Michael B. Jordan, we'll likely never forget it.

"The Place Beyond the Pines" -- The most underrated (and maybe most under seen) film of 2013 is an epic good-evil, father-son tale starring Ryan Gosling and Bradley Cooper. Find it now on DVD.

"Philomena" -- The ever-funny Steve Coogan (who co-wrote) and the always totally fab Judi Dench offer the year's most memorable road film. Based on still one more true story, it makes you laugh, cry and everything in between,
Leo DiCaprio enjoys tour de force work as "The Wolf of Wall Street."
"The Wolf of Wall Street" -- It's simply too fascinating to watch Martin Scorsese inspire his real-life-based bad boys and girls to work and play and carouse and steal and over-indulge for a mind-boggling three hours. The message must be in how easy it all looks.

A dozen more worth seeing -- "About Time," "All is Lost," "Dallas Buyers Club," "Disconnect." "Enough Said," "42," "Gravity," "Her," "Inside Llewyn Davis," "Nebraska," Saving Mr. Banks," "12 Years a Slave."

A dozen hours we'll never get back -- "After Earth," "Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues," "The Counselor," "A Good Day to Die Hard," "Evil Dead," "The Heat." 

Performers of the year -- Amy Adams ("American Hustle," "Her," "Man of Steel"); Leonardo DiCaprio ("The Great Gatsby," "The Wolf of Wall Street"); Tom Hanks ("Captain Phillips," "Saving Mr. Banks"); Brie Larsen ("Don Jon," "Short Term 12," "The Spectacular Now"), Jennifer Lawrence ("American Hustle," "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire") Matthew McConaughey ("Dallas Buyers Club," "Mud," "The Wolf of Wall Street").

TV stars become movie stars -- Julia-Louis Dreyfus ("Enough Said") and Will Forte ("Nebraska").

But what the hell were they thinking? -- Kristen Wiig ("Anchorman 2," "Girl Most Likely," "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty") and Bruce Willis ("G.I. Joe: Retaliation," "A Good Day to Die Hard," "Red 2").

Movie scene of the year -- The fantastical barrel chase in "The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug." The 15-minute action sequence is brilliantly executed in every way.

Who knows? Maybe "The Legend of Hercules" can top any of it.

Monday, December 16, 2013

'American Hustle,' '12 Years a Slave' lead Critics' Choice nods


The Broadcast Film Critics Association has announced the nominees for the 19th annual Critics’ Choice Movie Awards. Winners will be announced live at the Critics’ Choice Movie Awards ceremony on Thursday, Jan. 16, at the Barker Hangar in Santa Monica. The show will be broadcast live on The CW Network at 8 p.m. 

Among these "American Hustle(rs)," all but Jeremy Renner (center) are nominees.
“American Hustle” nods include Best Picture, Best Actor (Christian Bale), Best Supporting Actor (Bradley Cooper), Best Supporting Actress (Jennifer Lawrence), Best Acting Ensemble, Best Director (David O. Russell) and Best Comedy.

Nominations for “12 Years a Slave” include Best Picture, Best Actor (Chiwetel Ejiofor), Best Supporting Actor (Michael Fassbender), Best Supporting Actress (Lupita Nyong’o), Best Acting Ensemble,and Best Director (Steve McQueen).

“Gravity” also impressed with 10 nominations, while “The Wolf of Wall Street,” “Her,” “Captain Phillips” and “Nebraska” received six nominations each.

“Everyone acknowledges that 2013 has been a truly great year for films, so our Critics’ Choice Movie Awards voters had an embarrassment of riches to choose from,” noted BFCA President Joey Berlin. “BFCA members have loved covering all these terrific films all year long and now revisiting them before we filled out our ballots.  And we’re thrilled to have the lovely and talented Aisha Tyler hosting our gala awards ceremony."

Tyler, who is not new to the duties that come with hosting a show, serves as the new host of the critically acclaimed improv show, “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” on The CW Network, and is also a co-host of the Emmy-nominated show, “The Talk,” on CBS.
Chiwetel Ejifor heads the list of  "12 Years a Slave" nominees.

"We can’t wait for Jan. 16, when the Academy Award nominations will be announced in the morning and so many of their honorees will then make their first public appearance as Oscar nominees on our Red Carpet,” Berlin concluded,

The Critics’ Choice Movie Awards are bestowed annually by the BFCA to honor the finest in cinematic achievement. The BFCA is the largest film critics organization in the United States and Canada, representing more than 280 television, radio and online critics.  BFCA members are the primary source of information for today's film-going public.

A complete list of nominees follows:

BEST PICTURE
American Hustle
Captain Phillips
Dallas Buyers Club
Gravity
Her
Inside Llewyn Davis
Nebraska
Saving Mr. Banks
12 Years a Slave
The Wolf of Wall Street

BEST ACTOR
Christian Bale – American Hustle
Bruce Dern – Nebraska
Chiwetel Ejiofor – 12 Years a Slave
Tom Hanks – Captain Phillips
Matthew McConaughey – Dallas Buyers Club
Robert Redford – All Is Lost

BEST ACTRESS
Cate Blanchett – Blue Jasmine
Sandra Bullock – Gravity
Judi Dench – Philomena
Brie Larson – Short Term 12
Meryl Streep – August: Osage County
Emma Thompson – Saving Mr. Banks

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Barkhad Abdi – Captain Phillips
Daniel Bruhl – Rush
Bradley Cooper – American Hustle
Michael Fassbender – 12 Years a Slave
James Gandolfini – Enough Said
Jared Leto – Dallas Buyers Club

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Scarlett Johansson – Her
Jennifer Lawrence – American Hustle
Lupita Nyong’o – 12 Years a Slave
Julia Roberts – August: Osage County
June Squibb – Nebraska
Oprah Winfrey – Lee Daniels’ The Butler
    
BEST YOUNG ACTOR/ACTRESS
Asa Butterfield – Ender’s Game
Adele Exarchopoulos – Blue Is the Warmest Color
Liam James – The Way Way Back
Sophie Nelisse – The Book Thief
Tye Sheridan – Mud

BEST ACTING ENSEMBLE
American Hustle
August: Osage County
Lee Daniels’ The Butler
Nebraska
12 Years a Slave
The Wolf of Wall Street

BEST DIRECTOR
Alfonso Cuaron – Gravity
Paul Greengrass – Captain Phillips
Spike Jonze – Her
Steve McQueen – 12 Years a Slave
David O. Russell – American Hustle
Martin Scorsese – The Wolf of Wall Street

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Eric Singer and David O. Russell – American Hustle
Woody Allen – Blue Jasmine
Spike Jonze – Her
Joel Coen & Ethan Coen – Inside Llewyn Davis
Bob Nelson – Nebraska

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Tracy Letts – August: Osage County
Richard Linklater & Julie Delpy & Ethan Hawke – Before Midnight
Billy Ray – Captain Phillips
Steve Coogan and Jeff Pope – Philomena
John Ridley – 12 Years a Slave
Terence Winter – The Wolf of Wall Street

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Emmanuel Lubezki – Gravity
Bruno Delbonnel – Inside Llewyn Davis
Phedon Papamichael – Nebraska
Roger Deakins – Prisoners
Sean Bobbitt – 12 Years a Slave

BEST ART DIRECTION
Andy Nicholson (Production Designer), Rosie Goodwin (Set Decorator) – Gravity
Catherine Martin (Production Designer), Beverley Dunn (Set Decorator) – The Great Gatsby
K.K. Barrett (Production Designer), Gene Serdena (Set Decorator) – Her
Dan Hennah (Production Designer), Ra Vincent (Set Decorator) – The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
Adam Stockhausen (Production Designer), Alice Baker (Set Decorator) – 12 Years a Slave

BEST EDITING
Alan Baumgarten, Jay Cassidy, Crispin Struthers – American Hustle
Christopher Rouse – Captain Phillips
Alfonso Cuarón, Mark Sanger – Gravity
Daniel P. Hanley, Mike Hill – Rush
Joe Walker – 12 Years a Slave
Thelma Schoonmaker – The Wolf of Wall Street

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
Michael Wilkinson – American Hustle
Catherine Martin – The Great Gatsby
Bob Buck, Lesley Burkes-Harding, Ann Maskrey, Richard Taylor – The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
Daniel Orlandi – Saving Mr. Banks
Patricia Norris – 12 Years a Slave

BEST MAKEUP
American Hustle
The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
Lee Daniels’ The Butler
Rush
12 Years a Slave

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
Gravity
The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
Iron Man 3
Pacific Rim
Star Trek into Darkness

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE
The Croods
Despicable Me 2
Frozen
Monsters University
The Wind Rises

BEST ACTION MOVIE
The Hunger Games: Catching Fire
Iron Man 3
Lone Survivor
Rush
Star Trek into Darkness

BEST ACTOR IN AN ACTION MOVIE
Henry Cavill – Man of Steel
Robert Downey Jr. – Iron Man 3
Brad Pitt – World War Z
Mark Wahlberg – Lone Survivor

BEST ACTRESS IN AN ACTION MOVIE
Sandra Bullock – Gravity
Jennifer Lawrence – The Hunger Games: Catching Fire
Evangeline Lilly – The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
Gwyneth Paltrow – Iron Man 3

BEST COMEDY
American Hustle
Enough Said
The Heat
This Is the End
The Way Way Back
The World’s End

BEST ACTOR IN A COMEDY
Christian Bale – American Hustle
Leonardo DiCaprio – The Wolf of Wall Street
James Gandolfini – Enough Said
Simon Pegg – The World’s End
Sam Rockwell – The Way Way Back

BEST ACTRESS IN A COMEDY
Amy Adams – American Hustle
Sandra Bullock – The Heat
Greta Gerwig – Frances Ha
Julia Louis-Dreyfus – Enough Said
Melissa McCarthy – The Heat

BEST SCI-FI/HORROR MOVIE
The Conjuring
Gravity
Star Trek into Darkness
World War Z

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Blue Is the Warmest Color
The Great Beauty
The Hunt
The Past
Wadjda

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
The Act of Killing
Blackfish
Stories We Tell
Tim’s Vermeer
20 Feet from Stardom

BEST SONG
Atlas – Coldplay – The Hunger Games: Catching Fire
Happy – Pharrell Williams – Despicable Me 2
Let It Go – Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez – Frozen
Ordinary Love – U2 – Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom
Please Mr. Kennedy – Justin Timberlake/Oscar Isaac/Adam Driver – Inside Llewyn Davis
Young and Beautiful – Lana Del Rey – The Great Gatsby

BEST SCORE
Steven Price – Gravity
Arcade Fire – Her
Thomas Newman – Saving Mr. Banks
Hans Zimmer – 12 Years a Slave

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Nobody questions McConaughey's acting chops these days

TORONTO -- With the mostly acclaimed "Dallas Buyers Club" headed for wide(r) release Friday, everyone is hearing about Matthew McConaughey's bravura performance as an AIDS victim-turned activist pill-pusher.
However, when the film enjoyed its world premiere during September's 37th annual Toronto International Film Festival, some may have been wondering how the actor, who went from playing David Wooderson in "Dazed and Confused" (1993) to Ron Woodroof 20 years later in "Dallas," could possibly be so convincing.
Matthew McConaughey and Jennifer Garner in "Dallas Buyers Club."
During a festival-related interview two months ago, French-Canadian director Jean-Marc Vallee ("The Young Victoria," "C.R.A.Z.Y.") admitted as much. "If someone told me years ago that I'd be working with handsome Matthew on a movie of this magnitude," Vallee said, "I would have had my doubts.
"He was just at a place in his life where he wanted to change perception. He wanted to go out there and show himself and show the world that he's one fine (blankety-blank) actor. He simply gave a giant performance. I never witnessed something like this on a set."
On the other hand -- and in a separate interview -- one of McConaughey's current co-stars, Jennifer Garner, claimed that the actor's fire has been burning brightly for years.
"I absolutely disagree (that) Matthew's focus has only recently changed," said Garner, who plays a committed doctor in her latest film.
"I worked with Matthew five or six years ago, and it was by all accounts a sort of romantic comedy ("Ghosts of Girlfriends Past") that was fluffy. Still, the pages of his script were as covered in notes as these pages on this screenplay. He was as prepared, he was as committed, he was as serious about what he was doing.
"Maybe the content of what he is doing has changed and maybe being a father has done that," Garner concluded. "But I will say that the Matthew that you’re seeing now is the same one that I saw five years ago and, at the time, I thought, 'Wow, this is one hell of an actor,' and I’m still so lucky to be working with him."
The sickly thin McConaughey gives a towering performance.
For his part, and despite a well-publicized (at least) 40-pound weight loss to play the very ill Woodroof, McConaughey calls his current status "a really healthy time in my career."
"I’m enjoying and loving acting more than I ever have and I’m getting an experience from my work," McConaughey said in his own brief Toronto interview. "I’ve got a really great support system in my family. Where I go to work, they come and they allow me to put the blinders on. 
"And I’ve got a wife (former Brazilian model Camila Alves) who allows me to not look in the rear view mirror. And I’m still getting time with my family. Three kids sure help the job I do, too. They sure remind you that you’re playing make believe. so let’s make ‘em believe."
McConaughey, who is currently filming the hush-hush "Interstellar" for writer and director Christopher Nolan, thinks that even his recent quick succession of movies has helped his work.
"I came off of 'Magic Mike' into 'Mud,' and I remember having a very quick turn around for this one, too," he said. "If I have a quick turn around, I have to go, 'What are my similarities?' The thing with those two is they were both dreamers. They were both sort of in the clouds and off the ground.
"This guy Ron was more of a man of action. Another outcast, that’s for sure. Another guy who is thrown into isolation," continued the busy actor, who also has "The Wolf of Wall Street" coming out next month. 
McConaughey, whom Garner said "looked more horrible (from the extreme weight loss) in person than he does on screen," concluded by explaining the secret behind the only scene in "Dallas Buyers Club" that has him appearing like his own healthy self.
"We did that on purpose," he said. "We shot that when Jean-Marc came back to New Orleans just a few months ago, and I met him at a hotel. I had put 40 pounds of weight back on, and we went outside. I just sat on a bench in front of the hotel and he sat there with a camera.
"It was just me, there was no girl (in what looks on screen like a sex venue), so I acted like we were just having fun.
 "Remember," said the sure-to-be Oscar-nominated performer, "this wasn't a studio film, and we had to shoot it all in 27 days. I (weighed) 135 the whole film. When Ron was sick, we didn’t put any color or tan on my face. When he was more healthy, we put plumpers on my backside, and I loaded up my cheeks a little bit and got some color so I looked healthier. Basically, we’d shoot healthy Ron this morning and emaciated Ron that afternoon."
For more on "Dallas Buyers Club," look for a Q & A with McConaughey's equally dazzling supporting actor, Jared Leto, tomorrow at cleveland.com/Sun News.

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

'Divergent' trailer now on line; opens March 21



Summit Entertainment presents DIVERGENT, the epic sci-fi based on Veronica Roth’s best-selling book series.

Directed by NEIL BURGER

Screenplay by EVAN DAUGHERTY AND VANESSA TAYLOR

Based on the novel by VERONICA ROTH

Produced by DOUGLAS WICK, LUCY FISHER, POUYA SHAHBAZIAN
               
Executive Produced by JOHN J. KELLY, RACHEL SHANE

Starring SHAILENE WOODLEY, THEO JAMES, JAI CORTNEY, RAY STEVENSONZOË KRAVITZMILES TELLERMAGGIE QTONY GOLDWYN, ASHLEY JUDDANSEL ELGORT,MEKHI PHIFER, BEN LAMBBEN LLOYD-HUGHESCHRISTIAN MADSENAMY NEWBOLD and KATE WINSLET

In a future world where people are divided into distinct factions based on their personalities, Tris Prior is warned she is Divergent and will never fit into any one group.  When she discovers a conspiracy to destroy all Divergents, she must find out what makes being Divergent so dangerous before it’s too late.